Dirty hair has nothing to do with hair coloring!

josephkellner.com

Clients will always ask me if they need to wash their hair before they come in for a hair color service. And I am not talking about cement, mud on the hair and scalp.  The answer is no. Hair color, perms, highlights, are all chemical services that are done in the salon and only in the salon.   A buildup of oils, dirts in the hair will not be able to overcome the chemical strength of hair color or bleaches, or perms. They will not alter the chemical process of lifting or altering the hair structure of the chemicals being used in the service.  in fact when clients come in to have a hair color service and the hair is wet the only thing that will cause a problem is the time spent blow drying the hair to proceed with the hair coloring service. And that is a fact Jack!  Dirty hair (second day, third day is fine) makes it easier for the colorist to place foils in your hair. The natural oils also help protect your scalp from possible irritation the color could cause.  Hair color is stronger than oils, and dandruff, dirty hair. etc.. Hair is a chemical and I have seen it clear off the scalp of and all natural oils and day to day grease and grime.

*EXCEPTION – The only exception to  NEVER shampoo rule is chlorine. If you go swimming in a chlorinated pool the day of your color appointment, you must shampoo the chlorine out or there could be some funky results when the color reacts with the chlorine!

Is every 4 weeks enough for your haircolor?

 
In a world of highlights and lowlights, it can be tough to know how often you should actually color your hair. But because both dye and bleach are potentially damaging,  it’s important to learn the rules. If you have a lot of gray hair and are dying it a dark hue, you’ll probably need to go in for a touch up about every three weeks. But remember hair growth rules. Everyone grows nails, facial hair, toenails at a different speed.  In the same vein, if you have virgin or naturally dark hair (like brown or black) and dye it a light color (like blonde), you’ll need to tint it more often. Ultimately though, it all comes down to how much your newgrowth really bothers you.

Only dye your hair one color as opposed to highlighting it? Then the suggested wait time by both colorist and manufacturer is approximately four weeks. By that time the color has faded and/or oxidized. However, some clients choose to come in sooner (or hold off a bit longer) depending on how bad their newgrowth is. While highlights are a little subjective usually they’ll need to be touched up anywhere from every six to ten weeks. How much lighter you go from your natural color and how heavy or natural the pieces are woven in will determine where you fall within that timeline.

If you have highlights and also base color I recommend getting them done together first, then four weeks later you should do your base color only. So basically, every four weeks touch up your base, and ever eight weeks do your base and highlight. Multi- dimensional hair colors (highlights and lowlights) ensure a very natural look and will make your roots way less obvious as hair grows out.  The process might be more expensive but hey, the good news is, it lasts twice as long!

Hair color advice from a professional!

To help ease the damage of frequent coloring read these ideas for helping you with your hair color.

1. If you have a one tone hair color, use a permanent hair color on your new growth. Permanent  hair color often contains ammonia and can be more damaging, so refresh the rest of your hair with a semi permanent/ demi permanent hair color to add shine. This will also allow the hair to regain strength!

2. If you are more of a bleach blonde client, you can wait about six to eight weeks for a touch up, especially if your base is a lighter color naturally. When you do go in for a touch up, make sure your stylist never pulls the bleach down over previously lightened hair. This causes major damage and breakage. I just hate doing a photo shoot and having my model’s hair only 2 inches on the top.

Finally, to help push a few more days or weeks in between colorings, you can indulge in a color enhancing shampoos, but be careful a lot of the shampoos and conditioners are direct dyes. A direct dye is a preformed hair color molecule that act like a stain. What you put on the hair is what you will get with these products.

Protecting your Money!

Maybe you weren’t born with that gorgeous shade of hair on your head. There’s no shame in going to the salon to have your color perfected or completely transformed. But you want it to look as natural as possible — and you want it to last. Professional highlights or color can cost a lot, and require frequent visits to the salon. The last thing you’d want is all that color to wash down the drain — or worse, have it fade or turn brassy. Keep your color true and vibrant longer with a few simple tricks.

 

Deep condition with a color-enhancing shampoo. There are inexpensive formulas that gently deposit a tiny bit of color onto your locks each time you lather up. The difference will be subtle to you, and virtually undetectable to anyone else. They’ll just keep your color looking bright and shiny longer. Choose a shade that matches your natural haircolor; if you have highlights, go with a shampoo that closely resembles your natural shade.

Suds up with a color-safe shampoo, if you don’t feel comfortable using a color-depositing shampoo. There are many brands at different price points, from drugstore to salon lines, that hydrate dry hair without stripping it of color. Use these every time you shampoo to help prevent fading.

 Protect your locks from the sun. The sun’s rays can fade and even alter your pro dye job. Spritz on a UV-protecting spray any time you’ll be spending a significant amount of time outdoors. Definitely for days at the beach, but even if you’re heading to the park for an hour or two. If your hair is really delicate — for example, if you went from brunette to platinum blonde — consider covering it up with a head scarf or wrap to keep it from fading and drying out in the sun.

Use a glaze. A glaze locks color in your strands post-shampoo. Salons often apply them to freshly colored hair to seal in the color. You can keep the color trapped in by using a glaze in your own shower. There are colored glazes to spice up your hue, or you can use a clear glaze. Either version will enhance shine and keep your shade full of life. Stay away from products that have alcohol in there ingredients list. Also whan you are flat ironing the hair or using a curling iron. Stay away from pump hair sprays they have too much moisture in the ingredients.  Be realistic about your hair color choice with your stylist. One of the biggest turn off”s a stylist dislikes is when a consumer comes in for an appointment berating all the salons and stylists in their city. And never, ever come to an appointment mentioning you are going through the “CHANGE” and you are very emotional. We are all adults please learn how to police your emotions and behavior. Thats the quickest way for me to tell a consumer, ‘I cannot help you today”.

Josephkellner.com

Orlandomakeup.com

The benefits of hair color glossing!

If your hair color is  looking more matte than magnificent these days, it might be time to get color shimmer shining again with a gloss treatment.

What it is:

A glossing service is a semi- or demi-permanent service that works to enhance, tone, and refresh both natural and dyed hair colors. Especially blonde haircolor, keeping the tone is so very inportant.  Plus this will help keep that awful yellow out of the hair that blondes always fight with.

Why you want it!

The treatment not only improves the conditioner of your hair by strengthening the cuticle, but it also brightens your existing color or blends away gray by adding a photo-finish shine. Glossing treatments can never lighten hair, they only darken or change the tone. 

What to ask for

It’s important to explain your end goal. Are you looking to go darker? Add a hint of red? etc. The more you communicate to your stylist, the better your gloss will turn out. If you’re simply seeking extra glimmer (without an adjustment to the tone), opt for a clear gloss.

What Is Causing Your Itchy Scalp?

Having a dry, itchy scalp is an annoying skin condition. Find out why your scalp is itchy so you can take steps to get some relief.

Is itchy evera good thing? The answer has to be never. And when it comes to your scalp, this kind of irritation is often accompanied by embarrassing flakes. Here, skin and scalp experts explain what could be causing your scalp to itch.  Dandruff is the most common culprit to blame for an itchy scalp. The medical condition of dandruff is caused by an overgrowth of yeast.  The yeast normally live on your scalp and in other hairy areas, such as the eyebrows, the ears, and men’s beards. With changes in body chemistry, the yeast overgrow and feed on your dead skin cells and oils, which causes the itching and flaking.  To properly control dandruff, you need to eliminate its fungal component without creating more irritation and redness.

For mild cases,  use an over-the-counter shampoo that contains selenium, zinc pyrithione, or tea tree oil, all of which help control yeast. If your scalp is not itchy but more flaky, then try a salicylic acid shampoo to reduce buildup. More stubborn cases may require a prescription antifungal shampoo or cortisone foam, or, for especially severe cases, anti-yeast pills. Scalp itch can also result from trips to the hair salon. Repeated chemical hair treatments like permanent color, relaxers, and keratin treatments can sap your scalp of moisture.

Another culprit could be a daily blow-drying habit. The excessive heat can irritate and dry out the scalp. Avoid using the hair dryer at its hottest setting, especially when hair is very wet. That’s actually the hair’s most fragile state. 

An itchy scalp can also be an allergic reaction to certain hair products. Some products, such as hair sprays, contain ingredients that tighten as they dry. This causes a slight pulling sensation on the scalp, leading to itchiness. Sometimes the root of the problem is environmental. Other factors that contribute to scalp irritations include exposure to cool environments with low humidity, and the effects of wind and sun.

The way back to a healthy scalp (and healthy, shiny hair) begins with upping the moisture. Avoid hot water when washing your hair, because it can strip the natural oils from your scalp, making it very dry and sensitive. 

Sometimes an itchy scalp can be a red flag signaling other, more serious medical conditions. If your scalp develops thick, scaly patches that hurt, crack, or bleed, you may have psoriasis — a chronic autoimmune disease that appears on the skin. If, along with the itchiness, your hair is falling out or breaking, you may have ringworm. If any oozing occurs, or a crust develops or pus appears on the scalp, you could be suffering from a staph infection. Your safest bet is to consult your doctor with any concerns about an itchy scalp.

Look for moisturizing and protective ingredients like dimethicone, a silicone compound that smooths the hair surface, making it shiny also I recommend using a good conditioner to soothe the scalp and leave hair moisturized.