Tips For Your Skin Color

What is your skin type like? Are you oily, combination skin or normal? Depending on what your skin type is and what kinds of needs you are looking for depends on the formula to look for. Usually when shopping online for foundations, you can click the description of the product and it can tell you who the foundation is best for. When you go shopping and a sales person will say something like “Who it’s for: Normal to oily skin.”  which is super helpful when seeing if a formula works for you. You can also look for shade ranges that offer added skincare benefits or mention how it is formulated to wear on the skin. When shopping for foundations look for a range that offers not only a wide color range but also undertones – like warm, neutral or cool.

An undertone and skin tone are two different things to remember when shopping for a foundation. Under the skin is your undertone, an easy way to remember. During the seasons, especially summer or winter when you may be more tan or fair, your skin tone can change. But, your undertone never does. Cool undertones contain more blue. Neutral undertones are versatile and can wear neutral, warm or cool foundations and are between yellow and blue. Warm undertones are a little more on the yellow side.

How do you know if you have cool, neutral or warm undertones? Check your veins. If you have purple or blue veins, you’re cool. Blue or green, then you’re neutral. And green or olive veins, when you have a warm undertone. Now that you’ve got your undertone figured out, lets tackle the skin tone.

What About Deep Conditioning?

There is one exception, and it turns out that the best product for your hair costs $10 and is something you add to your food, and ethinic women love to use on their scalp and hair. Coconut Oil.  Your basic coconut oil, as it turns out, has just the right size and structure that it can penetrate into the cortex.  And therefore it can protect hair from the inside out. Good stuff everyone!

One of the most damaging things for hair is a simple wash and dry it because the water swells the hair and messes up the cuticle. Coconut oil prevents water from absorbing into the hair and so reduces the swelling damage. You may often get.

Common sense says that blow-drying is worse, for obvious reasons. It’s a lot of heat right next to your hair. I agree that air-drying is preferable to blow-drying, but I also say that air-drying itself can also cause harm. So either way it gets you.

There’s not a lot of data on this, but some think that air-drying damages hair because the hair remains wet for a longer period of time. That means more time for the water to swell inside the hair and mess up the cuticle. The longer the hair is wet, the more damage happens. But since hair needs to dry somehow, it’s still better to go for the one that doesn’t involve thousands of watts of energy right next to the cuticle.

Protein treatments are a mixed bag. They’re partly a marketing story, because you can’t actually repair damaged hair just by pouring on more protein. The protein doesn’t also get integrated into the hair structure itself to make it thicker, I find out when I use them in the salon it will dry out the hair. And if used to often it will break the hair. Damaged hair needs to be cut off!

To be clear, “purple shampoo” and “color-protecting shampoo” are different things. “Purple shampoo” is for bleached-blonde hair and it works because the purple tones even out the blonde color and keep it from turning orange.  But can also give the hair a grey cast to it and really dull it out. I like to use just shampoo and baking soda to keep out the discoloration you get in very light blond hair. It cleans it well.

But “color-protecting” doesn’t do much. The reason the color continues to shift is because the chemical reaction isn’t perfect for every molecule.  There will be some bigger color molecules, some little pieces, some will wash out, some will not — and that’s why your color will change and fade over time. Most color-protecting products don’t actually keep the color chemicals in the hair any longer. They don’t do much other than provide good conditioning. Which is very important with color treated hair.