When You Change Your Hair For Summer

Some of my clients favorite beauty traditions is getting their hair brightened in preparation for summer months. The physical shift never fails to get them excited for cookouts, picnics, and longer days, but they have experienced a mental shift when it comes to maintaining it. While it’s easy for me to see the hours spent at the hair salon as the start-to-finish of their hair coloring process, it’s really just the first step in maintaining healthy, beautiful hair for summer. Here are some idea’s to keep your hair color in top condition.

Bleach breaks down your hair, making it brittle and dry so stay away from protein hair care lines. Although purple and blue shampoos have recently become a popular method of keeping blonde highlights from turning brassy, they can still strip color from your hair. And it can also make you blonde hair color look ashy. Use a color treated shampoo and conditioner.

And just because one brand works for someone else, does not necessarily mean it’ll work as well for yours. So shop around and have a few different hair care lines in your shower.

In general, I recommend switching up your shampoo every 6 to 12 months. Each shampoo has different minerals and proteins so your hair will get a more well-rounded treatment of both when you rotate the brand you’re using.

When it comes to heat-styling your hair, go easy on the strands near your hairline by using a lower heat setting. When you lighten your hair, your strands actually become finer and more fragile. To avoid breakage, don’t run that flatiron over your lightened hair multiple times  (in fact, I highly recommend not using a flatiron if possible and just using a curling iron or wand). If you really need one, try doing a single pass for those hairs that frame your face.

A fresh cut or color is the perfect opportunity to switch up your makeup—I’ve HAVE clients gravitating towards a bold red lip color, as it makes their face look even brighter with their blonde hair! And switch up your outfits as a white top will always make your hair look brighter, and vice versa.  The biggest change I notice in MY  clients after they get their hair colored is how their mood and demeanor immediately lifts—embrace your new hair color and the confidence it gives you!

Limescale Is Harmful To Color Treated Hair and Skin.

Limescale is that white, chalky residue left behind by dissolved minerals (mostly calcium and magnesium) in your water. The higher the concentration of minerals in your water, the “harder” your water. So, if you have hard water, you’ve probably seen this white residue in your bathtub, sink or even on your glass dishes.  And trust me it’s in your hair also. Either way Limescale sounds like a nasty gross word. But if you have no water softener all the shampoo’s, conditioners, body scrubs and lotions will do no good. Limescale will leave a white film on your scalp, skin and fade artificial hair color fast!

The abundance of minerals and chemicals in hard water can leave behind buildup, so washing with it can leave behind a film-like residue. On skin, that residue can exacerbate breakouts, dryness and even bring on irritation, especially if you have sensitive skin. That’s not all: Hard water can affect the skin on your scalp, too, causing dryness and that tell-tale itch.

As for your hair, it may feel like it does when you haven’t thoroughly rinsed out all of your shampoo. So, you might notice it feeling dull, limp or super-dry (think straw-like) to the touch. On top of that, hard water can also lead to faster fading and altered color in color-treated hair. Minerals in hard water, like calcium and magnesium, bond to hair. This causes hair to look dull or discolored.

Most people can’t even tell if they have hard water. But if you can’t explain your dry skin and suspect your water, there are a few steps you can take. Clarifying shampoos contain chelating agents, which bond to the excess minerals on the hair, allowing them to be removed. Good to do at least once a week.  And for the skin try cleansing with a Micellar Cleanser which removes tiny particles and doesn’t require rinsing with water.

If all else fails get a water softener. Soft water, on the other hand, only has de-ionized sodium in it (sometimes it’s natural, and sometimes it’s the result of water treatment). Like hard water, it’s completely safe for drinking, bathing and cooking. And, unlike hard water, it’s actually kind of moisturizing. Some even say that soft water gives skin and hair a slippery feel.

Whether you have hard water or soft water might not even be a concern to you. And, if you don’t notice any adverse effects, there’s no reason to treat it. But if you have adjusted your beauty routine and don’t notice any improvement, it could be worth checking out.