Customer Service?

Do I Change My Hairdresser?

This is always a really tough question to answer because client/hairstylist relationships can range from very surface level to a personal connection. Without knowing where you may stand with your stylist, I want to offer as many suggestions as I can to help you navigate this tough conversation.  First, if you aren’t planning on returning to the salon ever again, and you don’t have a particularly close relationship with your stylist, I think it’s okay just to avoid rescheduling after your last appointment and then move on. It is not required to give a notice that you are leaving, and in some cases, that may come off as hurtful.

If you are hoping to see a different stylist at that same salon, that is a much more sensitive issue that involves more people and more feelings. In that case, it’s best to explain to your stylist what you would like to do, with the full awareness that you may hurt his or her feelings. Imagine yourself in their shoes and try to think of a sensitive way to explain what you’d like to do. When you book an appointment with the new stylist, know that it’s going to be uncomfortable to see your former stylist in the salon, and it may also be uncomfortable for your new stylist. The hope would be that everyone can look at this stylist change from a professional place, but that isn’t always the case.

More than anything, when you want to change stylists, try to explain why in a way that is clear and respectful. One direction you could go is to say that you are wanting a little bit of a change from an artistic perspective. Hairstylists are artists and everyone has a different style. Emphasizing that you are looking for a different look and are interested in seeing what someone else would do with your hair is a route that could be understood from your stylist, though still runs a risk to hurt feelings.  A similar situation that you may be in is liking your stylist but not being pleased with the results on your hair. In those cases, your best shot for improvement is to talk to him or her about how you are looking for a different result. Hairstylists are not mind-readers, so the more you can communicate, the better. Trust your stylist to know what is best for your hair-styling routine, texture, product usage, etc. so they are able to set you up for hair success!

In general, I always lean towards being honest and clear when having a tough conversation, even if it’s harder than ghosting a person. I know if I were in a position with a client that wanted a change I would so much rather be told from the client herself instead of wondering if I did something to personally offend her.

Customer Service?, Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice

Condition The Hair During The Summer

Summertime is important for the conditioning of the hair. To put it simply, conditioner is a conditioning or moisturizing agent generally made up of ingredients such as silicone, oils, and emollients.  When combined, these ingredients replenish hair’s moisture after some of it is stripped from shampooing.  Two minutes should suffice, as this is approximately how much time it takes for the conditioner to adhere to the hair. Conditioner refortifies the cuticle with a protective coating, allowing the hair to keep growing and not break easily.

When the hair is exposed to the outside world, the cuticle, or outer lining, gets damaged until it ultimately breaks; the conditioner fills in those injuries and coats the hair to assist the cuticle. Conditioners also smooth the hair, de tangle it, increase shine, reduce frizz, and make it feel nicer to touch.  All you have to do is to wash your hair, only apply conditioner to one half of your head, then comb through the hair to notice the differences.  Any time you shampoo your hair you should condition it.

While the format of your conditioner may make a difference for instance, a moisturizing conditioner might contain more oils and emollients to soften and smooth the hair. The composition of your typical post-shampooing conditioner doesn’t change a whole lot from formula to formula.  If you’re not conditioning your hair, you should probably start. But, don’t be fooled by the marketing terms and instead, try out a few different types or consult a hairstylist to find out what works best for you in terms of overall effect and personal preference.

If you’re acne-prone and fail to rinse out your conditioner thoroughly enough, it’s possible  that you could break out on your face, neck, or body since conditioner can clog pores just like any product comprised of oils.  Another potential adverse effect of conditioners is that they can weigh the hair down.  If you use more than a palm-sized dollop, or if you use a kind that contains a very high concentration of oils and emollients this can contribute to the hair looking greasy or flat. Hair can become more brittle, susceptible to tangles, and prone to breakage with the absence of a conditioner.  If you stop using conditioner, your hair will likely be more difficult to comb, It will also be more likely to have fly-aways and frizz and be prone to splitting and breaking during your styling routine.  Your hair may look duller and less shiny, so there’s that. Do yourself a favor and just condition your hair, LADY’S!