Haircolor and Makeup Advice, Makeup Advice

MAC Strobe Creme Is A Must For Skin During A Photo-Shoot!

This product is a must for my models when I am shooting in the sunshine. The product has a very nice glimmer to it. And when applied to the legs, arms, and chest it will give you a lovely glow. This is a must for my preparations of my Black and Brazilian models, the product will show up on darker skin and give it a beautiful sheen and highlight. But on fair skin I seen to get shadows with color and that is not what I want in my photography. I always apply this product to all my models for lovely highlights to the skin. And if you are going out at night it works perfectly for you.  I highly recommend this. Work the product in your hand about a dime size if possible and apply to the skin where you want the highlights.

If the product is to strong for you dilute with a little hand creme and then reapply. Work the product in well or it will become streaky.  If you are applying the product to the face I would recommend using a small feathered makeup brush. And only use small amounts at a time until you get the desired look you want. Blend, Blend, Blend.

I recommend the Goldlite and the Peachlite.  For dark to medium skin.

The ultimate quick fix for skin now in shades of pink (original), peach, silver, red and gold. Super-powered with potent botanicals.  It boosts the look of dull, flat or tired-looking skin with nutritious vitamins and a mega-dose of green tea. Brightens and clarifies with iridescent particles and antioxidants. Adds the softest glow to skin in sunlight to spotlight.  Give it a try.

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice

Graphene Hair Dye Is Coming, And It Looks Incredible

A research team at Northwestern University has discovered a way to use sheets of graphene to dye hair. Unlike current chemical hair coloring products, the scientists report in the journal Chem that their new dye is nontoxic, antibacterial, antistatic, and you can apply it yourself with a spray. It looks like we can add “the holy grail of hair color” to graphene’s seemingly endless list of applications.

This is how it works: The user applies the graphene dye using a spray, then brushes the hair and dries it. The graphene forms a gentle film around each and every hair strand. Like in a sci-fi movie, your hair will change color before your very eyes as the sheets of graphene attach themselves to your mane. And since the research team says their method doesn’t require toxic solvents, or molecular ingredients, or extreme heat, you don’t have to worry about damaging your hair, skin, or yourself. The color lasts for at least 30 washes, like what you expect from any conventional chemical-based dye. The graphene material will disappear leaving your hair in the exact same state as it was when you applied it.

Your graphene-enhanced superhero hair will also have some other super powers. First, it’s anti-static–so you can say goodbye to flyaway hairs. Secondly, it’s antibacterial–your hair will stay cleaner longer. Third: thermal regulation capabilities. In theory, your graphene-enhanced hair will be able to regulate the heat on your head better than your regular hair.

The fourth power is quite intriguing. The Northwestern team mentions that your graphene-treated hair will be able to interface with electronic components, since the coating can carry an electrical current. I can’t imagine the potential applications for this one–beyond adding LED beads that could display different colors depending on the thermal conditions of your scalp (purple for anger, for instance, or green for happiness).

So when will you be able to pick up a box of this dye at Walgreens? I asked Jiaxing Huang, research lead and professor of materials science and engineering in Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering: “I am optimistic,” he says, although he couldn’t give me a precise timeline yet. There’s no word on potential price points for a final product either. Right now, the main problem holding them back is the available colors. Their graphene-based dye comes in different shades of black and brown at the moment. There’s no blonde, red, or any other hue. However, Huang tells me that they already have some ideas about how to solve this: “Once we secure research funding to work on this, we expect [the other colors] can happen within a few years.”

So we’ll have to wait at least “a few years” for the perfect cyber dye job. Until then, the closest thing to a holy grail of hair color is still at the salon.

Customer Service?, Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice

Not At Home Please.

JosephKellner.com

If you want to go from dark brown to a lightest light blonde get thee to a hair salon. Don’t try this at home.  That said, many friends and beauty editors I know turn to the box when coloring their hair. These days boxed color can be gorgeous. But you have to do it right, go to a salon. Here are the biggest mistakes women make when doing their color themselves.

They Bet Their Hair Color on the Picture on the Box

Pictures on hair color boxes can be deceiving. Go by the color swatches and the descriptions instead. Most boxes will call out the color (blonde, brown, black and red) and the shade of that color (light, medium and dark). There might also be mention of the tone (golden or ashy).  Go to the salon please.

They Try to Do It Themselves

Try as you might, it’s virtually impossible for you to see the back of your head. This is why I recommend enlisting a friend, family member or even your boyfriend or husband to help you color your hair. The process will go so much more smoothly.  You get what you pay for my friends.

They Leave the Color on Too Long

Always set a timer for your hair. Many women end up leaving the color on their hair too long and end up with over-processed hair.  Over-processed hair is very unattractive.

They Rinse Their Hair Out in a Sink

Kitchen and bathroom sinks don’t have enough water pressure to rinse out the hair chemicals completely, which can damage hair. Instead, step into the shower and rinse your hair thoroughly.

They Don’t Read the Instructions

Box color has been around forever, so they’ve gotten the directions down. If they didn’t, women wouldn’t buy again. Just because you’ve dyed your hair before at home with one brand doesn’t mean another brand of hair color stays on the same amount of time.

Always read the directions before proceeding. Let the hair colorist do it.

They Run Out of Product

If you have thick, curly or long hair, you run the risk of running out of product as you apply it. Always buy two boxes of hair color.  A salon atmosphere has everything for your hair coloring service, including wine.

They’re Commitment-Phobic

Some women have what I call “Hair Color ADHD.” Like singles who are commitment-phobic, the minute they find a hair color they like they’re ready to try something new. Finding a color you love is like winning the lottery. You could be making a huge mistake trying a different color or different brand.

They Choose the Wrong Color Tone for Their Complexion

Most of us would like to think we are both warm and cool. But when it comes to hair color, it’s important to know which one you really are (and it has nothing to do with your fantastic personality).

They’re Unhappy With All-Over Color

If you look closely at the hair of a child or a woman whose hair you absolutely love, you’ll notice there are many shades of color. All-over color from a box is basically a wash of one color. If one-dimensional hair is not what you’re after, you might be better off getting highlights at a salon.

They’re Brunettes Trying to Go Blonde or Red

Again, anything more than 2 shades darker or lighter than your natural hair color, should be done in a salon. Taking black or brown hair to blonde or red is absolutely possible, but is usually a complicated process that could involve more than one visit to the salon.

To determine if blonde or red is right for you, try on wigs first to see if the color washes you out or enhances your look. And then head to the salon to get the job done. Don’t pick up a box. Women who have red in their skin and burn easily should stick to cool shades described on the box as “ash,” “beige” or “cool brown.” Warmer colors will only bring out the redness in your skin. Some women fall somewhere in the middle and can look good in a wide range of warm and cool shades.

Joseph Kellner Salon Orlando, Florida 32819

Haircolor Advice

Is every 4 weeks enough for your haircolor?

 
In a world of highlights and lowlights, it can be tough to know how often you should actually color your hair. But because both dye and bleach are potentially damaging,  it’s important to learn the rules. If you have a lot of gray hair and are dying it a dark hue, you’ll probably need to go in for a touch up about every three weeks. But remember hair growth rules. Everyone grows nails, facial hair, toenails at a different speed.  In the same vein, if you have virgin or naturally dark hair (like brown or black) and dye it a light color (like blonde), you’ll need to tint it more often. Ultimately though, it all comes down to how much your newgrowth really bothers you.

Only dye your hair one color as opposed to highlighting it? Then the suggested wait time by both colorist and manufacturer is approximately four weeks. By that time the color has faded and/or oxidized. However, some clients choose to come in sooner (or hold off a bit longer) depending on how bad their newgrowth is. While highlights are a little subjective usually they’ll need to be touched up anywhere from every six to ten weeks. How much lighter you go from your natural color and how heavy or natural the pieces are woven in will determine where you fall within that timeline.

If you have highlights and also base color I recommend getting them done together first, then four weeks later you should do your base color only. So basically, every four weeks touch up your base, and ever eight weeks do your base and highlight. Multi- dimensional hair colors (highlights and lowlights) ensure a very natural look and will make your roots way less obvious as hair grows out.  The process might be more expensive but hey, the good news is, it lasts twice as long!

Hair color advice from a professional!

To help ease the damage of frequent coloring read these ideas for helping you with your hair color.

1. If you have a one tone hair color, use a permanent hair color on your new growth. Permanent  hair color often contains ammonia and can be more damaging, so refresh the rest of your hair with a semi permanent/ demi permanent hair color to add shine. This will also allow the hair to regain strength!

2. If you are more of a bleach blonde client, you can wait about six to eight weeks for a touch up, especially if your base is a lighter color naturally. When you do go in for a touch up, make sure your stylist never pulls the bleach down over previously lightened hair. This causes major damage and breakage. I just hate doing a photo shoot and having my model’s hair only 2 inches on the top.

Finally, to help push a few more days or weeks in between colorings, you can indulge in a color enhancing shampoos, but be careful a lot of the shampoos and conditioners are direct dyes. A direct dye is a preformed hair color molecule that act like a stain. What you put on the hair is what you will get with these products.
Haircolor Advice

Men can look Younger with Hair Color!

Hey Guys! Our gray hair can make you look distinguished or it can make you look old and tired. Sometimes it lends credibility and other time it lands you a date at the retirement home for a 4 p.m.dinner.  I know guys who gray prematurely and find themselves mostly gray in their mid 30′s, and I also know guys in their late 40′s that have not shown any signs of graying–not fair, but true. Whatever you decide to do about it, you should feel comfortable with the decision.

Men and hair coloring have been taboo subjects. For some the conversation is just as “off the table” as the “don’t ask, don’t tell” gay policy for the military. But regardless of its status, men’s home hair coloring business is booming. According to industry experts, it grew by over 10% during 2012.

What is the right color for you!

Any of us could color our hair pink, green or black (if we wanted to) but depending on our hair color, the process varies from a simple one-step hair color to a more complicated double coloring process. This said, here are the colors that are easiest to achieve with one-step colors. Generally, for those with black hair, it’s easier to achieve shades of red and dark brown. For those with brown hair, coloring to achieve other shades of brown, blond, caramel, and red tends to be more straightforward.

Finally, men with blond hair can easily get their hair lightened or altered to browns and reds.Your choice of color should also be based on the analysis of your skin tone.
There’s no general rule in determining which hair color will suit your skin tone best.

 However, men with darker complexions look better with “cooler tones.” The most flattering coloring options for men with darker skin tones are golden highlights, golden with red highlights, golden brown, honey brown, chestnut, copper, auburn, mahogany, and warm tones of gray and white. On the other hand, guys with pale skin should opt for warmer colors. For more flattering results, choose colors such as plum, burgundy highlights, ash, platinum blond, brown, dark brown, black, slate, salt and pepper, and white.

Here are some tips about home hair color and read them wisely!

Your “natural” color is lighter than you think. Always go for a color that’s a shade lighter than what you think you need. The longer the stuff stays on your head the darker it becomes. So pay attention to time. Use a mirror and make sure you get the back of your head as well. Just because you can’t see back there, doesn’t mean the rest of the world cannot either. The dye will stain your skin, meaning anywhere it touches including your forehead, ears, hands. It also stains wood cabinets and even tile (don’t ask how I know.) The older you get the lighter your hair should be. If you are thinking of dying your hair, don’t wait until your head is completely gray or the change will be very drastic. “Whoa, what happened to you?” is not what you’re going for. Once you get started, you’ll need to do it every few weeks. It’s a commitment. Spend a few dollars and have a professional do it. You won’t regret it.

Good Luck!

Joseph Kellner Hairdresser/Makeup Artist

Orlando, Florida 32819

http://www.JosephKellner.com

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice, Makeup Advice

Hair Color Salons In Orlando, Florida Joseph Kellner

Time was when your hair color choices were blonde, red, brunette, and black, but those days are long gone! Each basic hair color comes in a full array of choices from platinum blonde to jet-black. Moreover, the modern consumer must choose from non-traditional hair colors that range from hot pink to chartreuse. However, the wrong hair color choice can give you the blues and leave you red in the face!

First Hair Color Choices
The best method in choosing a hair color is first to choose the results you want from it. Depending on whether you are covering gray, highlighting a natural hair color, or using hair color to completely change your image, knowing what you want helps you to narrow down hair coloring choices.

Before you get down to choosing a hair color, first decide on your commitment to hair coloring. Temporary hair colors wash out in a shampoo or two, semi permanent products typically last for a couple of months, while permanent dyes may either give you grow-out pains or necessitate frequent root touch ups.

Choosing a Compatible Hair Color
After you’ve decided on results and made your commitment, it’s time to get out the color wheel. Beauty experts tell us that we’re either “cool” or “warm” depending on our skin tone, eye color, and natural hair color.

  Cool Category Warm Category
Eyes Dark Brown, Black-Brown, Gray Blue, Dark Blue, or Hazel with white gray or blue flecks Golden brown, Green, Green-Blue, Turquoise, Hazel with gold or brown flecks
Hair Blue black, Deep brown, Ash brown, Ash Blond, Platinum Blond Deep brown with gold or red highlights, Red, Strawberry Blond, Gray-Yellow, Natural Golden Blond
Skin Very dark brown, True olive, Medium pale, Medium with golden undertones, Pale, Bronze Brown with pink or golden undertones, Peachy or with peachy undertones, Pale with gold undertones, Freckled, Ruddy

Although this is good advice, if you’ve just finished a tanning session, if you have some complexion problems (Rosacea, liver spots, blemishes), or if your hair color is already not what nature intended (in other words previously tinted or more salt than pepper), it may be difficult to determine by examining your skin tone and hair color. Don’t despair! There is a shortcut!

Examine your wardrobe. Cool hues are green, blue, and violet. Warm hues are reds, oranges, and yellows. Chances are, your wardrobe is a mix with either cool or warm hues in the majority. Clothing colors that look good on you and make you feel comfortable probably indicate if you’re in the cool or warm category. For instance, if olive drab makes you fade into the woodwork, then cool tones like ash blonde (ash tones contain green) are probably not for you.

In addition, most commercial hair colors have aids on the box, yet if you have a hard time deciding which group is your group, you may want to seek the advice of a professional hair stylist.

Hair Color Tips:

  1. Highlighting is a great way to add tone to monochromatic hair (jet black, pure brown).
  2. Beware of hair colors that have green, blue, or purple undertones, like “ash”. If you mix them with warm tones, your hair color will turn out green.
  3. The levels (one to twelve) you see on hair coloring boxes are the lightness or darkness of the color. Level one is black (darkest) and level twelve is light blond.
  4. “Complimentary colors” are opposite each other on the color wheel. Blue-orange, violet-yellow, etc. If you want to neutralize unwanted highlights, choose the complementary color. For instance, red will cancel out an ash undertone, and an ashen color neutralizes any red highlights in your hair.
  5. Be sure to check if your hair color is a “progressive dye”. Progressive dyes continually add more color with each use. For instance, if you’re coloring blond hair black, your first use of a progressive hair color may not give the result you expected. However, continued use will turn your hair jet black.
  6. Hair colors, like perms, are chemically based so if you’re pregnant, be sure to check with your doctor before coloring your hair.
  7. Henna hair dyes are organic based hair colors that don’t mix well with chemicals. Stay out of the pool and the ocean after coloring your hair. Neither sea salt nor chlorine mixes well with chemical hair colors.

 Joseph Kellner
Hairdresser – Haircolorist – Makeup Artist

407- 421- 5857

7250 Kirkman Road
Orlando, Florida 32836

Haircolor/Corrective hair color and also hair design is my speciality! Appointments can be made either by phone or by email. Makeup services are available in the salon. For special ocassions, film, print. Iuse Goldwell hair color, Scruples hair color and Framesi hair color for all salon services. 

Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Haircolor Technique Advice by Joseph Kellner

 

Twilighting:When you want a lighter hair color to show a subtle change, twilighting is the answer. Twilighting tones down too-bright hair colors by adding a few darker tones. Twilights are closely related to lowlights.

Lowlights:A hair coloring technique that adds real depth to hair color. Like twilights, low lights add darker tones and soften the look of over-lightened hair or add dimension to hair color that looks flat. A skilled stylist can weave up to three different colors into your hair by pulling a few strands here and there through a weave cap for a subtle look or foiling chunks of your hair for a dramatic, trendy look.

Veiling:Brightens and enhances old flat hair color by applying a semi-permanent glaze in a richer tone over a permanent shade.

Chunking:Takes large, random sections of hair and infuses them with new color. Chunking is a hair coloring technique that gives dramatic impact to your hairstyle, often by adding bright, trendy colors to natural hair color.

Hair Coloring Technique Processes
Weave caps:Used most often in highlighting, twilighting, and lowlighting, your stylist pulls small strands through holes in the weave cap. The effect is usually a subtle change that enhances your basic hair color. Highlighting with a weave cap also helps to camouflage gray or roots growing back after a permanent hair color application.

Foiling:Your stylist places sections of hair onto rectangular sheets of foil and applies color or lightener, folding the foil to keep the color in place and away from other sections. Of all highlighting techniques, foiling can be applied closest to the root.

Baliage:A great application for textured, natural curls, or wavy hair. Your stylist selects specific areas and hand paints them with color. This dramatic implementation of a hair coloring technique leaves you with a very “personal” appearance!

It’s important to note that although kits are available for most all hair coloring techniques, professional stylists have the skill that comes with experience. Especially for hard to color shades like gray, platinum, and black hair, it’s wisest to consult a professional before you try a new hair color technique at home!