Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Joseph Kellner hair care tips for colored treated hair!

Highlights and dyes can damage your hair. We’ve got the tips to keep your hair healthy and your color vibrant.

Always use products specifically designed for color-treated hair. Only color-safe products have the technology to help you keep your salon-perfect color vibrant and fresh.

After you color your hair, wait two or three days (if you can make it) before shampooing to allow the color to absorb completely. If you want to shower, use conditioner in place of shampoo to give extra moisture without stripping the color.

Be especially gentle with color-treated hair — coloring weakens hair and makes it more prone to breakage. Only use covered elastics to tie it back and brush it with a natural bristle brush when it’s dry.

Never go swimming without protecting your color. Before going into a pool or the ocean, apply a leave-in conditioner on damp hair to prevent the chemicals and salt from stripping your color.

Don’t go to a tanning bed or sit in the sun without covering your hair. The UV rays will react with your color and may alter it or cause it to fade, so cover your hair with a scarf or hat.

Don’t forget to condition your hair daily! Colored hair needs extra moisture to keep it soft and smooth.

In order to get the best look for your sexy new style, you need strong and beautiful hair. Try these simple strength-building tips for healthy, durable locks.

To prevent breakage, apply conditioner in the shower and rinse. Don’t rough dry wet hair out of the shower with a towel as it will damage hair, blot hair instead to remove the moisture. Rough drying will only cause more damage.

Always condition your hair if it’s prone to breakage. Conditioning is the best way to give your hair the nourishment it needs to stay strong. And especially if it is colored treated, and foiled highlighted.
 
Use detangling spray and a wide-tooth comb on damp hair — wet hair is more delicate.
 
Sleep on a satin pillowcase if your hair is especially delicate. Satin won’t snag your hair or cause friction like cotton, which can rough up the cuticle of extremely fine hair.

Don’t use elastics that have metal clasps on them. Always tie up your hair with covered, snag-free elastics.

Try not to sleep with your hair tied back. Leave your hair down as often as possible at night to prevent breakage.

To prevent frizz, Blow dry hair with a Smoothing Cream to create smooth texture. Getting the right brush is key for frizz-free hair. Invest in a boar-bristle brush with a rubber base to smooth and straighten hair. Or use a thermal brush.

To prevent breakage, wash hair with Sulfate Free Shampoo and Conditioner. Hair is most fragile when it is wet, so after washing, dry hair gently with a towel to absorb excess water. Avoid brushing until most of the moisture has evaporated.

If you have really fine hair and are afraid of conditioning, apply conditioner first in the shower and then shampoo your hair. That way, your hair gets the moisture it needs, and you’ll get the clean, full-bodied feeling of a fresh shampoo.

Rinse, Rinse, Rinse! Any conditioner left on your hair will weigh it down and won’t allow you to get the most optimal style.

Never brush your hair with a metal or bristle brush when it’s wet. Use a wide-tooth comb or a vent brush on damp hair to prevent breakage.

When applying conditioner, focus on the mid-shaft to ends as that is where the most damage is; you don’t need to moisturize the roots.

Dry, brittle hair also looks flat and lacking shine. Apply a moisturizing conditioner after you shampoo, making sure to rinse it out well.

If your hair is brittle, don’t be afraid to lightly rinse conditioner out of your hair — it may benefit from a little conditioner left on your ends.

If your hair is fine, don’t try to over-condition it — this will only weigh it down. Pick the right conditioner for fine hair to add back moisture.

For naturally stronger, healthier hair, make sure you have a balanced diet. Your hair is a reflection of your inner health, so design your eating habits accordingly.

Once a week, deep condition your hair to leave it ultra soft and super strong. Apply your usual conditioner all over damp hair and put hair in a shower cap or towel. Leave it on your hair for 10 minutes and then rinse thoroughly. After shampooing and conditioning your hair, do a final rinse with cool water to seal the cuticle and leave hair looking extra shiny.

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Haircare Advice for Women with Colored Treated Hair!

 

Try not to over condition the hair, especially if it is color treated! When your hair feels dry in the heat or humidity, you may be tempted to double up on the moisturizing products. But heavy moisturizing ingredients, especially those that contain oil, can make your hair oilier and look dirty. They’ll also make your regular styling products less effective.Instead, apply a half-dollar amount of conditioner midway down your hair. Work it through to the ends and don’t massage it into your scalp. The scalp and roots are already coated with your natural oils, which help to condition the hair.  Also, go easy on the treatment oils, serums, and sprays, which can contribute to build-up.

Clarifying shampoo can be a great treatment when you have build-up on your scalp from styling products or chlorine. But since they are so tough on dirt, they’re also very harsh on your hair and strip it of moisture. This will make your hair dry and frizzy. If you have colored hair, clarifying shampoo will also strip away the color and cause it to fade.Instead, use a clarifying shampoo only once a month. Your regular shampoo should be something more gentle and moisturizing.

Wet hair is more fragile dry hair. It’s more susceptible to snags and breaks. It’s a good idea to use a wide-toothed comb to detangle it, rather than a bristle brush. Pulling it into an elastic hair band can cause further damage or break the hair shaft. Instead, use a soft headband or bobby pins to pull your hair back from your face when it’s still wet.