Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Jamaican Black Castor Oil Strengthen & Restore Styling Lotion

Trying new products for color treated hair is important to me. And keeping a revolving product line for my clients is also very important. Using the same products over and over at the salon or at home will leave a build-up on the scalp and hair. It is good to change all your hair care tools all the time.

I have since tried the Shea Moisture product line often on my clients and have found out it works beautifully for highlighted hair. Especially for fine to medium types of hair textures.  Styling lotions are important for the blow-out of hair styling for the client and I personally do not like to use a lot of products on the hair. I feel the hair design is very important.

So a month ago I tired the Shea Moisture Styling Lotion and it worked great for my clients.

This precious oil based lotion protects while restoring moisture and lustrous shine to dull, damaged or chemically processed hair. Nutrient-rich Jamaican Black Castor Oil, certified organic Shea Butter and invigorating Peppermint combine in an ultra-moisturizing formula to protect against the damaging effects of high heat styling, while increasing hair’s resistance to breakage.

I applied a quarter sized amount in my hands and applied it to my clients hair, and combed the product throughout with a wide tooth comb. I gave her a blow-out and curled the hair and it did a very good job. Leaving the hair very soft.

When you have clients with high-lift hair-color the hair is very fragile so protection is needed. Stay away from protein based styling products and shampoo’s and conditioners for the hair. It will make the hair fragile and dry. Use moisture based products. Give this product a try at home or recommend it to your stylist. Shea Moisture.

 

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Great Product To Achieve Smooth Finishing Styles

I love trying out new product to get a very good finish to there hair. Redkens Anti-Frizz Polishing Milk does a great job for all my finishing work. It is a very light weight creme to use with a light scent not over powering. and a quarter size is just enough for medium to long hair.  I also use it for a cutting tool to give me the control I need for designing the clients hair style.

This lightweight anti-frizz hair polishing milk cream for all hair types delivers mild control, incredible hair shine and sleek smoothness that also repels humidity.

  • A light cream for mild control
  • Adds incredible shine and sleek smoothness
  • Shea butter smooths and controls frizz

  • Apply a small amount evenly through damp hair and style as desired.
  • Apply on dry hair for extra shine and to ban frizz throughout the day.
  • Layer with other styling products to achieve different styles.

Give it a try everyone a very good product to use.

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice, Makeup Advice

When You Change Your Hair For Summer

Some of my clients favorite beauty traditions is getting their hair brightened in preparation for summer months. The physical shift never fails to get them excited for cookouts, picnics, and longer days, but they have experienced a mental shift when it comes to maintaining it. While it’s easy for me to see the hours spent at the hair salon as the start-to-finish of their hair coloring process, it’s really just the first step in maintaining healthy, beautiful hair for summer. Here are some idea’s to keep your hair color in top condition.

Bleach breaks down your hair, making it brittle and dry so stay away from protein hair care lines. Although purple and blue shampoos have recently become a popular method of keeping blonde highlights from turning brassy, they can still strip color from your hair. And it can also make you blonde hair color look ashy. Use a color treated shampoo and conditioner.

And just because one brand works for someone else, does not necessarily mean it’ll work as well for yours. So shop around and have a few different hair care lines in your shower.

In general, I recommend switching up your shampoo every 6 to 12 months. Each shampoo has different minerals and proteins so your hair will get a more well-rounded treatment of both when you rotate the brand you’re using.

When it comes to heat-styling your hair, go easy on the strands near your hairline by using a lower heat setting. When you lighten your hair, your strands actually become finer and more fragile. To avoid breakage, don’t run that flatiron over your lightened hair multiple times  (in fact, I highly recommend not using a flatiron if possible and just using a curling iron or wand). If you really need one, try doing a single pass for those hairs that frame your face.

A fresh cut or color is the perfect opportunity to switch up your makeup—I’ve HAVE clients gravitating towards a bold red lip color, as it makes their face look even brighter with their blonde hair! And switch up your outfits as a white top will always make your hair look brighter, and vice versa.  The biggest change I notice in MY  clients after they get their hair colored is how their mood and demeanor immediately lifts—embrace your new hair color and the confidence it gives you!

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Tips To Get Your Hair Longer

GIVE YOUR HAIR A REST.  Laying off the dye/bleach/straighter/hairdryer is the most obvious suggestion in the book. But have you ever actually tried only using heat on your hair for super special occasions, and dying your hair 50% less than you think you need to? If you want to grow your hair (not to mention have the kind of hair that takes less than five minutes in the morning), you need to give it a rest and appreciate it in it’s natural state.

TIE IT UP.  Braid it, low-pony or relaxed bun. The best way to actually give your hair a rest and encourage growth is to tie it up. That way it’s less exposed to the elements, products and just general wear and tear.

USE A PADDLE BRUSH. The wider the brush, the less tension you’re likely to inflict on specific part of your scalp or hair. The spread out bristles are best for avoiding unnecessary hair damage, especially when COMBING OUT your hair.

TAKE SUPPLEMENTS.  There are so many hair supplements out there, so do some research to figure out what works for your hair type. For me – now this is going to sound a little crazy crazy – a stylist years ago suggested taking pregnancy vitamins to stimulate hair growth, and for me; it’s the only thing that works. No, you won’t get pregnant, yes, your hair will grow long and luscious.

MOISTURIZER ISN’T JUST FOR YOUR FACE.  You’d never forget to moisturizer your face right? Well the same goes for your locks. Whether a moisturizing cream or a hair oil is more your jam, remember to apply frequently for deliciously hydrated locks.

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Limescale Is Harmful To Color Treated Hair and Skin.

Limescale is that white, chalky residue left behind by dissolved minerals (mostly calcium and magnesium) in your water. The higher the concentration of minerals in your water, the “harder” your water. So, if you have hard water, you’ve probably seen this white residue in your bathtub, sink or even on your glass dishes.  And trust me it’s in your hair also. Either way Limescale sounds like a nasty gross word. But if you have no water softener all the shampoo’s, conditioners, body scrubs and lotions will do no good. Limescale will leave a white film on your scalp, skin and fade artificial hair color fast!

The abundance of minerals and chemicals in hard water can leave behind buildup, so washing with it can leave behind a film-like residue. On skin, that residue can exacerbate breakouts, dryness and even bring on irritation, especially if you have sensitive skin. That’s not all: Hard water can affect the skin on your scalp, too, causing dryness and that tell-tale itch.

As for your hair, it may feel like it does when you haven’t thoroughly rinsed out all of your shampoo. So, you might notice it feeling dull, limp or super-dry (think straw-like) to the touch. On top of that, hard water can also lead to faster fading and altered color in color-treated hair. Minerals in hard water, like calcium and magnesium, bond to hair. This causes hair to look dull or discolored.

Most people can’t even tell if they have hard water. But if you can’t explain your dry skin and suspect your water, there are a few steps you can take. Clarifying shampoos contain chelating agents, which bond to the excess minerals on the hair, allowing them to be removed. Good to do at least once a week.  And for the skin try cleansing with a Micellar Cleanser which removes tiny particles and doesn’t require rinsing with water.

If all else fails get a water softener. Soft water, on the other hand, only has de-ionized sodium in it (sometimes it’s natural, and sometimes it’s the result of water treatment). Like hard water, it’s completely safe for drinking, bathing and cooking. And, unlike hard water, it’s actually kind of moisturizing. Some even say that soft water gives skin and hair a slippery feel.

Whether you have hard water or soft water might not even be a concern to you. And, if you don’t notice any adverse effects, there’s no reason to treat it. But if you have adjusted your beauty routine and don’t notice any improvement, it could be worth checking out.

 

 

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

What About Deep Conditioning?

There is one exception, and it turns out that the best product for your hair costs $10 and is something you add to your food, and ethinic women love to use on their scalp and hair. Coconut Oil.  Your basic coconut oil, as it turns out, has just the right size and structure that it can penetrate into the cortex.  And therefore it can protect hair from the inside out. Good stuff everyone!

One of the most damaging things for hair is a simple wash and dry it because the water swells the hair and messes up the cuticle. Coconut oil prevents water from absorbing into the hair and so reduces the swelling damage. You may often get.

Common sense says that blow-drying is worse, for obvious reasons. It’s a lot of heat right next to your hair. I agree that air-drying is preferable to blow-drying, but I also say that air-drying itself can also cause harm. So either way it gets you.

There’s not a lot of data on this, but some think that air-drying damages hair because the hair remains wet for a longer period of time. That means more time for the water to swell inside the hair and mess up the cuticle. The longer the hair is wet, the more damage happens. But since hair needs to dry somehow, it’s still better to go for the one that doesn’t involve thousands of watts of energy right next to the cuticle.

Protein treatments are a mixed bag. They’re partly a marketing story, because you can’t actually repair damaged hair just by pouring on more protein. The protein doesn’t also get integrated into the hair structure itself to make it thicker, I find out when I use them in the salon it will dry out the hair. And if used to often it will break the hair. Damaged hair needs to be cut off!

To be clear, “purple shampoo” and “color-protecting shampoo” are different things. “Purple shampoo” is for bleached-blonde hair and it works because the purple tones even out the blonde color and keep it from turning orange.  But can also give the hair a grey cast to it and really dull it out. I like to use just shampoo and baking soda to keep out the discoloration you get in very light blond hair. It cleans it well.

But “color-protecting” doesn’t do much. The reason the color continues to shift is because the chemical reaction isn’t perfect for every molecule.  There will be some bigger color molecules, some little pieces, some will wash out, some will not — and that’s why your color will change and fade over time. Most color-protecting products don’t actually keep the color chemicals in the hair any longer. They don’t do much other than provide good conditioning. Which is very important with color treated hair.

Haircare Advice, Haircolor Advice, Haircolor and Makeup Advice

Things You Should Know About Cleansers For The Hair

As a consumer here are some topics choices from me you should know about shampoo’s and conditioners. Very important. Since beauty products are such an everyday part of our lives, it’s easy to forget that they are a form of technology backed by studies. Our first instinct when trying to understand a medical breakthrough might be to read the research, but our first instinct when switching shampoos is to ask a friend with really nice hair what works for her. And the beauty industry spends millions to market products with clever wording that imply big promises. Most beauty research is done by cosmetic chemists — the scientists that formulate and develop products — and a lot of it is published in academic journals like the Journal of Cosmetic Science. These journals are usually pay walled and access to the articles (which are dense and full of jargon) is expensive.

Break Down Of Hair. The outside, or the part that everyone sees, is called the cuticle and made of five to 10 overlapping layers of protein like shingles on a roof. These protect what’s underneath, which is the middle section called the cortex. The cortex holds long bundles of proteins that give hair its strength and keep it from breaking. And at the center is an empty zone called the medulla that helps insulate the hair. Not all hair has the medulla. It’s usually found in coarse, dark hair. When it comes to hair products, the most important part is the cuticle. When the layers of protein lie smoothly against each other, hair looks shiny and smooth. Everyday things like brushing and washing hair makes the cuticle stand up straight. That makes it frizzy and more prone to breaking and split ends.

 Shampoo. When it comes to hair products, the most important part is the cuticle. When the layers of protein lie smoothly against each other, hair looks shiny and smooth. Everyday things like brushing and washing hair makes the cuticle stand up straight. That makes it frizzy and more prone to breaking and split ends. This is a selling point from manufacturers.

The rise of conditioner is probably the biggest trend right now as natural-looking hair becomes more popular. And people are shelling out. We bought 5 percent more conditioner in 2017, according to market-research firm Euromonitor International. And not just any conditioner, mind you, but a lot more “cleansing conditioners” that we use to “co-wash.” Co-washing sounds fancy, but just means skipping shampoo. It began around 2012 as a niche trend among the kind of people who are quick to try new beauty tricks. It’s not niche anymore. Mainstream brands like Herbal Essences, Head and Shoulders, L’Oreal, and Wen have all introduced cleansing conditioners, and it’ll probably keep getting bigger.

Shampoos contain a type of molecule called surfactants. One end is attracted to water, and the other end is repelled by water and attracted to oil. The oil-loving end attaches to the grease and dirt in your hair, while the other end attaches itself to the water from the shower. That way, when the water washes out the shampoo, it also washes out the grease attached to it. Conditioners work by smoothing the outer layer so that the cuticle layers lie flat. Remember those “sulfate-free” claims that we see on shampoo now? Sulfate is a very common type of surfactant, and people who are concerned about too much shampoo think it works too well. Supporters of the (badly named) “no ‘poo” movement say sulfate is too harsh and strips away a lot of the hair’s natural oil, called sebum, which makes us produce even more than we normally would to make up for it constantly being taken away.

The good news is that there’s little evidence that shampoos are all that bad. They remove oil and dirt from cuticles, but they don’t go inside the hair. They can’t completely strip hair like the bleach. If you shampoo often and your scalp gets red or irritated, you should switch to a different kind.